My baby daughter, when you point to your belly button and ask “what’s this” with a grin on your face, my mouth says “belly button,” but my heart says:

This is the mark on your body that connects me to you. It doesn’t fade with age. It will always be there to remind you that my lifeblood is your lifeblood. You are a part of me; you grew with me, you ate with me, you cried with me. I knew you before I met you, I loved you before I knew you.

So when you look down at your belly button, know that although you are out in the world now, roaming, learning, laughing, being…you are still from me, you are still within me. An umbilical cord no longer connects our bodies, but a love that cannot be cut will always connect our hearts.

"And We have enjoined upon man [care] for his parents. His mother carried him, [increasing her] in weakness upon weakness, and his weaning is in two years. Be grateful to Me and to your parents; to Me is the [final] destination" (31:14).

Asmaa Hussein 

subhaan’Allah. A mother’s love is truly unexplainable. In shaa’Allah I get to experience such a bond. 

Tears, everywhere.

(via storyseldomtold)

(Source: yourmuslimsista, via gh3tt0superstar)

Too many young women I think are harder on themselves than circumstances warrant. They are too often selling themselves short. They too often take criticism personally instead of seriously. You should take criticism seriously because you might learn something, but you can’t let it crush you. You have to be resilient enough to keep moving forward, whatever the personal setbacks and even insults that come your way might be. That takes a sense of humor about yourself and others. Believe me, this is hard-won advice I’m putting forth. It’s not like you wake up and understand this. It’s a process.

Do not teach your daughters to be ‘pretty.’

Do not entomb her in a pretty pink tower
and insist that only the degree of her physical appeal
may set her free.
Teach her to fight her way out,
to consume books and spit knowledge
to lesser boys who insist she is just beautiful
and nothing more.

Teach her to love her body
not to manipulate and put a price tag on herself
as a defined worth
she shall be immeasurable
she shall be more than this.

Do not let her break herself down
when the boy in kindergarden hits her
because he likes her.
What are you really teaching her?
Pain and love are not synonymous
neither are pretty and perfection.

Teach her to be kind
to be harsh
to be demure
to be wild
to be sensitive
to be thick-skinned

But good god,

Do not teach your daughters to be ‘pretty.’

Michelle K., Do Not Teach Your Daughters to Be ‘Pretty.’  (via bhagyawati)

(via gh3tt0superstar)

Lately when I look at my parents, I notice all their wrinkles when they talk, and their dark circles, and the puffiness of their eyes when they laugh. They’re growing old with each day that passes and it breaks my heart to know they’ll never get any younger than they are today. Time has passed so quickly and it’s crazy how this year my father is turning fifty. That’s so hard to believe because it seems like just yesterday when people mistaken him for my older brother. And my mother, were those crinkles there before? I’m not sure. I just hope I make them proud when I finally graduate. Choose a career I love and be able to buy them nice things without them telling me not to because I’m still just a child and I shouldn’t spend money on them. Maybe I’ll always be a child to them. But one day, I hope they’ll see me as that little girl that’s grown so much and be proud of the grown woman that stands before them.
Ming D. Liu (via hcauq)

(via hustlinh)

Promise Yourself

To be so strong that nothing
can disturb your peace of mind.
To talk health, happiness, and prosperity
to every person you meet.

To make all your friends feel
that there is something in them
To look at the sunny side of everything
and make your optimism come true.

To think only the best, to work only for the best,
and to expect only the best.
To be just as enthusiastic about the success of others
as you are about your own.

To forget the mistakes of the past
and press on to the greater achievements of the future.
To wear a cheerful countenance at all times
and give every living creature you meet a smile.

To give so much time to the improvement of yourself
that you have no time to criticize others.
To be too large for worry, too noble for anger, too strong for fear,
and too happy to permit the presence of trouble.

To think well of yourself and to proclaim this fact to the world,
not in loud words but great deeds.
To live in faith that the whole world is on your side
so long as you are true to the best that is in you.

— Christian D. Larson, Your Forces and How to Use Them (via observando)